Late Bloomers

 
Blooming Later in Life Has it’s Advantages
 
shutterstock_200055521 woman field arms open
 
I always thought that being a late bloomer was a negative thing, like you missed out on so much because you achieved success later in life. I didn’t give it much thought. I floated along in life for a long time, oblivious to what career success truly meant.
 
I was one of the lucky artist-designers to get an early start on my career – I had no clue what it was going to be. During the winter break of my sophomore year in college, the father of my high school BFF asked me if I was interested in being a summer intern at his advertising agency. Hello job-handed-on-a-silver-platter. 
 
That summer I learned how to key-line and paste-up an agricultural quarterly magazine, spec type for the typographer, operate the stat machine and lucigraph, prepare boards for the printer, and also get insights into the world of advertising. It went so well that I returned the following two summers interning until I graduated and became a full-fledged production/layout artist.
 
After 3 years, I discovered that while I loved laying out publications, I was bored of agriculture, and decided to move onward.
 
I bounced around from one small design studio to the next in Milwaukee—creating more publications! At 31 years old, I was restless once again and the winter weather finally wore me down, so I made the brave move to Tampa, Fl. I was quickly hired at a large ad/design agency because of my love for publications and my mad skills creating them.
 
This time I was designing and producing an annual 90-page catalog/brochure done in 20 different languages for Royal Caribbean Cruises Int’l first, then for Celebrity Cruises Int’l.
 
I fell in love with the lifestyle niche there and then, and thought my career path was solid. It was the best place I had ever worked. Not going anywhere. Where’s the party?
 
Looking back, I never seriously thought about my future or had any real goals I wanted to reach, except just becoming a lead designer there, and partying with my friends. The only true growth I experienced at the agency was learning how to handle the high stress, manage the designers who assisted me, and juggle 20 publications at one time.
 
By the time I turned 35, I was the master of producing publications, but my design skills were just ok. I was never pushed to do great design, the work was more about information architecture design and how to fit a whole lotta content in 90 pages, and make it look good. After 6 years of that, I got burnt out.
 
Luckily an opportunity arose in Los Angeles and I quickly made a decision to leave Florida behind—California was always my dream anyway.
 
10 months later, my life became uncertain when 9-11 hit and I was left without a job. I worked on a United Airlines account and well, you know the story.
 
This is where the real story begins, about finding my true self and blooming later in life at the age of 50.
 
I moved to San Diego after visiting a friend there [here]. While it felt like home to me, I also felt lost and like I didn’t fit into the design community. I couldn’t land a full time position at any design studio or agency to save my soul. I knew I was good, but I wasn’t THAT good. And I was either too experienced or under-experienced.
 
So, I freelanced in order to get work and pay the sunshine taxes. I wandered for years and years—working part-time onsite and offsite. I did whatever I could to get by. And my design skills suffered. Once in awhile I got a great project, but even then, it was not my best work.
 
I don’t know what changed within me, but I do know my transformation from being an ok designer to doing my best work ever, was due to working with my creative business coach [RaShelle Roberts], and also from where I was at the time in my life when I was introduced to her. I had hit rock bottom—I was raw and broken, I was lost…so lost. How could I have ended up like this midlife? How did I let time slip by? I was too old to be hired, and worried what would become of me.
 
I won’t go into the details of the process we went through, but I can tell you she made me dig deep—to find out who I was as a person, as a designer, what I truly wanted in life, and in my career. Lots of soul searching, reading, writing and amazing a-ha sessions with RaShelle over the course of 5 months.
 
I had come back to dezinegirl creative studio 100%. I had stopped the vicious circle of getting part time work when my business got slow, which would cause me to lose my focus on dezinegirl and have to start all over again when the gigs ended.
 
During the process [it’s still a process] with RaShelle I discovered the niches that I loved to do and did so well at. My passion for design was reignited when I started designing infographics on a regular basis, and I also had the amazing opportunity to brand a new restaurant in Canada. I was on a roll.
 
Something shifted, something changed within me. I started to SHINE. I started to BLOOM. At 50 years old, I finally had confidence in my design abilities. I knew what I wanted, who I was, what I was willing to let go of, and what my focus was. Three years later, my design skills are top-notch—good, no, great design just flows out of me naturally, like a God-given talent. I can’t say the work has flowed in as easily—I’m still trying to even out the feast and famine cycles…but that’s normal.
 
But what I can say is that I am where I ought to be. That whole journey of my career path led me to where I am today: A LATE BLOOMER. And there is nothing wrong with that. I am a successful, gifted and sought-after designer…happy to be a solopreneur working from home on a variety of amazing lifestyle brand design projects.
 
To top that all off, I have hit the highlight of my career path [so far]. I was awarded [and I didn’t even have to compete] the redesign of all the menus for the Ritz Carlton in Rancho Mirage/Palm Springs [there’s another story there]. They are a wonderful team there, and the hotel and desert are so lovely.
 
It blows my mind… but at the same time, it just seems right.
 
Worth waiting for.
 
 

dezinegirl brand has grown up

Yes, it’s true, dezinegirl has grown up! Well, sort of…I will always remain young at heart, but that doesn’t mean my own brand has to {I’ve kept the name at least}. As the years go by, my talent, skills and tastes get more refined, and it just seemed to me that it was time dezinegirl got a facelift to reflect this {and well, I love to play with design!}.

I have received many compliments from peers or clients on my previous brand and website, and some have asked me why would I change what already looks good?

Many brands never change their logo because it works for them, but they update their brand style to stay on-trend, remain current and keep up with their industry. And that is what had to be done for dezinegirl as well. As I grow, mature and change, so does my brand need to.

A refreshed brand can lead to new business or bring a new perspective to current clients that gets them thinking I want to work with dezinegirl!; and hopefully receive bigger projects to fuel my design passion…and buy more coffee!

CHECK OUT THE NEW WEBSITE! >

dezinegirl creative studio brand new look

dezinegirl creative studio brand new look

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact dezinegirl for your next project that needs a refresh!
THE COFFEE IS ON ME!

The Art of Comfort Food & Branding

In the Summer of 2013, I had the wonderful opportunity and experience of a lifetime most designers dream about:  branding design for a new restaurant!

Plow & Harvest – The Art of Comfort Food restaurant was a new concept in Alberta, Canada conceived by Joe Ricketts, founder of Ameritrade and owner of the Chicago Cubs. His dream was to bring a farm-to-table, fresh-fast casual concept to a market that was saturated with either fast food or sit-down steakhouses. The idea behind a farm-to-table concept is that the food is locally-sourced so that it not only provides food at it’s freshest state, but also supports the local ecology and economy. Farm-to-table restaurants consider this their selling point.

Working with AccessPoint Group, who provided the all the resources to get the restaurant up and running, we created everything from scratch {pun intended} – the logo and branding, signage, menus for print and web, business cards, flyers, promotional pieces, uniforms, a responsive parallax website, and even exterior and interior decor!  Executive Chef James Bailey put his spin on comfort foods that tailored to the hearts of Canadians – from Baked Macaroni & Cheese, Buttermilk-Fried Chicken Sandwich {my favorite}, to BBQ Bison Meatloaf and Roast Alberta Beef Au Jus. Quick comfort to fill up bellies on the go.

At first, the Canadians didn’t understand the concept having to order their food at the counter and then sit down to have their dish delivered – like we are used to in the States. The combination of fast food and a sit down restaurant. Eventually they fell in love with the fresh, delicious food, superb service and attention to details. And we learned that Canadians love to sit for long periods of time, especially with their favorite local beer or mixed drinks!

Unfortunately, as in many cases of new concept restaurants, Plow & Harvest did not survive through the winter. Even the passion behind the makings of a great restaurant concept cannot survive a market where it can’t thrive. It was a sad blow since we all put our hearts and souls into this project. But as they say, onward and upward!

I created a brand board to showcase a mere glimpse into all the branding that was created for Plow & Harvest.

Cheers!

Branding Elements for Plow & Harvest

Branding Elements for Plow & Harvest